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tv   The Papers  BBC News  June 24, 2018 11:30pm-11:46pm BST

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hello. this is bbc news. we'll be taking a look at tomorrow mornings papers in a moment, first the headlines. president erdogan has claimed victory in turkey's presidential and parliamentary elections, but opposition has not yet accepted defeat. england fans celebrate after harry kane's men make it through to the knock out stages of the football world cup in russia, thanks to a record—breaking win over panama. new measures aimed at halving the number of obese children in england by 2030 have been announced by the government. leaders of 16 eu member states have been holding talks in brussels on migration, after italy and malta banned charity rescue boats from their ports. donald trump has called for illegal immigrants to the us to be deported immediately without anyjudicial process. hello and welcome to our look ahead to what the the papers will be
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bringing us tomorrow. with me are charlie wells, from the economist and joel taylor, deputy news editor at the metro. many of tomorrow's front pages are already in. the telegraph says the transport secretary has called on mps to back a third runway at heathrow airport ahead of a commons vote tomorrow. the express has warnings from the police federation over resources ahead of donald trump's visit to london. the i reports on the backlash experienced by a woman after she accused a former mp of sexual abuse. the guardian leads on calls from mps and campaign groups to reduce home office fees in
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relation to asylum and immigration. the times says more than 30 thousand children are now said to be part of criminal gangs across the uk. the mirror reports on britain's shipment of plastic waste to bangladesh where gangs allegedly exploit child labour at recycling plants. and the daily mail leads on a growing trade in stolen british passports used by criminals to try to access britain. will begin with a story in the times. 30,000 children in gangs. this is really sad. about 30,000 children between the ages of10— this is really sad. about 30,000 children between the ages of 10— 15 cents to be involved in gangs. what the story talks about is the role they seem to be playing in the drug trade. the article goes into a very specific, well rehearsed way in which children are recruited and play a role dictated by drug dealers
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and one of the problems seems to be, this is a telling quote, that gangs are taking the place of society. this is a telling quote, that gangs are taking the place of societym is not just are taking the place of societym is notjust in urban areas, there is this county alliance idea. —— county lines. rural areas and big cities and taking children to different parts of the country and operating these networks there. and —— and long filled talks about the rise in school exclusions. problem children, getting thrown out of school and there is very little support. we see everywhere in society, the lack of young people —— things for young people to do in many places. when they have these troubled children that are vulnerable and they end up
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being exploited. and criminalised at such a young age when in fact they are the victims. they can't necessarily make their own choices, cannot control whether they are being watched by their parents or not. lot of contributing factors and one that middle—class people should pay attention to is that middle—class drug users need to take responsibility for their contribution to the surge in violence. because drugs are bought and sold in the black market, bring criminal activity. let's look at the guardian. campaigners call for action over disgraceful immigration fees. much higher here than in other countries. what is interesting is the rate in which they have grown. these are people who are trying to get naturalised applications to live here and it was £700 in 2011 and
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these fees are rocketing. somebody trying to get a settlement visa for a dependent relative would now be asked to pay £3250 of. what is shocking is the profits that the home office can make. this study says that in some cases they are making 100% profit. —— 800%. is almost like it is an in—house business. they say the actual cost of processing the application is only £372. these charges come at a time where these people in particular can least afford it. that is completely true. i have to pay these fees and they are — me and i ama these fees and they are — me and i am a middle—class professional in london, i can only imagine somebody who has come here from a country where wages are very low, the problems they could face and the story goes into that. the people trying to side between accommodation
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and paying for these fees, there is and paying for these fees, there is afamily and paying for these fees, there is a family that is still paying back the £7,000 that they borrowed. a family that is still paying back the £7,000 that they borrowedm a family that is still paying back the £7,000 that they borrowed. it is per person. it is incredibly expensive and this idea of creating a hostile environment has spilt over into many areas of immigration and this is essentially creating an expensive environment where of course, a banker from expensive environment where of course, a bankerfrom new york who has come to work for one of the largest country —— companies in the world can afford it at for an asylum seeker this is unaffordable. this has been brought up because of the windrush scandal and lots of those fees are being waived for those affected by that. but we saw from the scandal that it wasjust people from the caribbean who had been a fa ct from the caribbean who had been a fact that, it was from across the commonwealth. looking at the daily telegraph. the we are. it is tiny,
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just here. —— near we are. telegraph. the we are. it is tiny, just here. —— nearwe are. —— telegraph. the we are. it is tiny, just here. —— near we are. —— there. duke praises jordan as just here. —— near we are. —— there. duke praisesjordan as a haven for refugees. prince william. he is on a tourin refugees. prince william. he is on a tour injordan, refugees. prince william. he is on a tour in jordan, following refugees. prince william. he is on a tour injordan, following injeremy corbyn's steps. he is addressing, celebrating how jordan has corbyn's steps. he is addressing, celebrating howjordan has opened its borders to take in millions of refugees and this is part of a five—day trip that prince william is doing and he has visited the palestinian territory is, will visit israel and obviously he couldn't find a more challenging part of the world for him to two. —— tour. pointing out the extent to which jordan has gone to cope with vast numbers of refugees is quite significant. particularly today after the 16 eu member states were
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talking how to cope with migration in large numbers. and leaders across the developed world have been blaming refugees for their problems and it is incredibly refreshing to see a country actually take responsibility and care for people who are in a precarious political situation. let's look at the daily mail. shocking trade in stolen uk passport. it feels like the stories are interconnected. two sides of the same coin. millions of people who have been, in jordan's same coin. millions of people who have been, injordan's case, who have been, injordan's case, who have fled from syria and so many of them end up being exploited by trafficking gangs and what the mail has done is highlighting how criminals over here and across western europe are stealing passports to take over and sell and can take people into the country.
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these people that i can manage to buy a passport from, he claims that seven of ten of his clients can succeed in getting into the uk. seven of ten of his clients can succeed in getting into the ukw is frustrating and difficult if you do lose your passport to replace tom about this is the consequence of what happens when it has been taken. and it is expensive to get a new passport. you know, this has been happening for a long time. people have been creating false documents, from passports to others, i think it feels a little bit like fear mongering, pandering to this idea that people are scared of foreigners and is playing right into that. i think there is a problem here with one of the words that is used, talking about his earlier. the writer refers to" dangerous illegals", i think that terminology doesn't learn —— belong in journalism because no person is
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illegal. i think that is a dramatic term. they are criminal gangs, no matter their nationality or status. plastic, we are neverfar away matter their nationality or status. plastic, we are never far away from a plastic story. lots of investigations tonight on the front pages. the daily mirror is where we will go next for another investigation and exclusive. britain's plastic shame. way we send oui’ britain's plastic shame. way we send our bottles of. as soon as you think you are doing the right thing, you are doing the wrong thing. what seems to be happening is written is sending over 100,000 kg of plastic to be sorted in bangladesh. —— brittin. so when you do your part and put the bottles in the recycling, it gets sent off and it is cheaper to sort items in bangladesh then in the uk. —— britain. this is a frustrating, unintended consequence in trying to act in the interests of the planet when you find out that part of the
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supply chain might involve child labour. there are organisations that try to root out this modern—day slavery, child labour, to ensure countries know where they are sending to and what is actually happening. i think they do a very good job, but they are facing an almost impossible task as we are recycling so much. you would like to think it was going to your local recycling centre around the corner and being turned back into our bottles up it of course, it is on such a huge scale that it is hard to keep track of where everything is going. the other issue is that if we are sending them all that way, how much environmental damage i were doing in transporting empty bottles? right! we are using fuel. i think the recycling industry faces a difficult business challenge, which is that in a lot of ways it has to
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make profit, there are subsidies in certain areas. i remember a few weeks ago we were talking about this idea of taking plastic bottles back to the shop like we used to with class and you get your 5p refund. maybe that might, when it takes off... maybe that might, when it takes off. . . the maybe that might, when it takes off... the shop where you could take your wattles and refill olive oil and things like that topic it is practised —— rather sad to see. and things like that topic it is practised -- rather sad to see. we cannot finish without talking about the football. we believe in miracle. that is harry came's patrick. tom said we missed a trick with our headline. panama patrick. we had a
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separate thoughts of the 6—1 against panama, who were happy with their dole. it is a slaughter. it is nice to have some good news of. —— single goal. i think this is setting a really nice tone and maybe for the rest of the world cup. you never know, depending on who we get next. it is important that we remember that the english cricket team beat australia 5— milk, and the rugby team. and the formula 1. but of course it was down to belong to the football today. harry came as being spoken about in very elevated terms, by his own manager. he is. what is refreshing about harry kane is that he seems very down to earth and has is, no earings, doesn't have a silly
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haircut and routine said something along the lines of he —— of how he doesn't do a silly dance after a goal. bit of a football player from yesteryear are seem to be effected by fame yesteryear are seem to be effected byfame and yesteryear are seem to be effected by fame and money. he is 24, 205! think. -- 25. america are not even playing in it. they get to post it time after next, so i am rooting for england this tournament. time after next, so i am rooting for england this tournamentlj time after next, so i am rooting for england this tournament. i am glad to hear it. that's it for the papers. don't forget you can see the front pages of the papers online on the bbc news website. it's all there for you — 7 days a week at bbc.co.uk/papers — and if you miss the programme any evening you can watch it later on bbc iplayer. thank you. and now on the news channel, it's time for the film review.
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